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, also known as sequestration. follow all the florida-based starting tuesday with white house coverage on c-span and the senate on c-span2. >> next, fox news channel contributor michael barone and norman ornstein examined election results. this event was hosted by the american enterprise institute. it's just under two hours. >> good afternoon. minus karlyn bowman, i'm a senior fellow here at aei, and on behalf of my aei colleague, michael broken norm ornstein and henry olsen, and our c-span viewers, i'd like to invite all of you to this final session of the aei election watch 2012 season. i'd like to breed and produce one of our colleagues, ben wattenberg, who helped to start the aei election watch series in 1982. ease with us here today. ben wattenberg and the late richard scam and were the first people to look at the interaction of demography and public opinion data in the 1970 book, the real majority. they told us that important changing demographics of the two future elections, and in this election are pathbreaking insights have been confirmed. like he knows were a larger share of
will go live now to an event with florida, former florida governor jeb bush. he's delivering opening remarks at an education summit in washington. the two-day summit is hosted by the foundation for excellence in education. >> i was in tallahassee and ahead to recruit to tallahassee in 1986. i don't think he's ever forgiven me for that. but he was the secretary of commerce as you may remember for a couple years. and after i negotiate his salary, the day governor elect renegotiate his salary, not upward but downward it turns out. that's what he is never an forgiven me. we became friends as he served in that administration. in 1993, 20 years ago, after coming off a statewide campaign, jeb and i were playing golf in miami and we went back to his house. i said she, jeb, i think have you ever considered running for governor? he said, what? the running for governor? i wouldn't do that if i were you. i'm going to run for governor. we don't think long and hard about these things, but i'm just going to do it. that was in february of 93, and at that time i've had the honor and privilege to be h
on hold. you need to turn down the volume on your tv. we have bob in florida. >> caller: this is a great show and i appreciate that show in the guest as well. i am working on something and i am listening to you guys at the same time. i believe there are at least a handful of us who certainly appreciate this stuff. mr. johnson's perspective on this and his ability to articulate the issues. let me get right in to my dilemma. i work at a local and state level to advocate for the inclusion of a detailed analysis of options in the information of progressive ideas, and that progressive policies on various issues at the local and state government as private citizens. what i have found is that the established order of things has been inhibiting the implementation of innovation. let's say, certainly i have specific examples that i won't go into, but you probably know, public utilities, like how they operate, and they can hold back innovation and innovative applications of new technologies because they are in concert with the state regulators to protect their interests. it inhibits the evolution o
. they are the good sense to live in florida in june instead of december in massachusetts, but then they were wiped out by the spanish. we completely let the story out of the textbooks. the most famous woman in america was taken captive by indians 6095, marched up in new hampshire. in the middle of the night she killed her captor, realized she could get a penalty for scalps, indian scouts. she went back, scalp them, made her way to boston where she was a heroin. they erected a statute to are. the first statute to an american woman, shows her with a hatchet in one hand and a scalpel in another. kenneth davis is our guest on sunday on in depth. the best selling author of the don't know much series. watch live at an eastern booktv on c-span2. >> now a group of american diplomats and former ambassadors advised the next administration to focus its foreign policy effort on issue. former ambassador to iraq chris hill said political gridlock is hurting u.s. foreign policy objectives. and asian policy is a good place to rebuild i partisanship to the discussion is just under two hours. >> thank you all for b
burned with a response to hurricane andrew in florida. and clinton wrote in his autobiography, i made a mental note at the time, i'm not going to get elected because of my disaster management record but i could sure lose this job i'll make darshan going to hire a pro that will really with fema into shape, which he did. and then bush junior comes in the. he has a government agency after eight years, which everybody likes. no one is mad at fema in 2000. and then bush, for nobody is reason to me, besides forget it, let's start privatizing functions again. let's put and political cronies again. let's go back to the old way. and he got burned. and so obama comes back and put in a pro. people are pretty happy with response of sandy so far, and you haven't heard much about fema the past three years because like most government agencies when they do the job you don't hear about it. that's why the challenges of being a liberal. and enron is on the record saying when faced with fema from any opportunity you can do to turn over to the state or the private sector you should do it. why can't a con
. .. but florida, virginia, you know, then it needed to go into iowa, it needed to go into nevada. then ohio would have put him over the top, and just didn't get anywhere near down that progression. and so, i mean, they're sort of a lot of things going on, but the most important thing is the republicans, i'm going to leave plenty of room, is that got to do something about their brand. it is just, basically the center, the center of the republican party is older white men. and that's not where this country is going. and when you look at african-americans, look at latinos, look at the fastest-growing group, asians, where that went 70 -- i think obama got 71, 72% of the asian vote. you know, the future doesn't look like the republican party. and if i worked the republican party, and i think, they're going to have to do some real soul-searching about immigration, about social cultural issues. because this is not a party that is designed for the future. if this were a business you would say they have an inherently flawed business model for the future. and republican parties have, you know, they have fo
does that and doesn't decide to go for budget, then it would probably be bill nelson from florida who just won re-election. but here's the thing, this is my conspiracy-minded ways going on here, but if let's say that ron wyden decided that he really wanted budget and didn't want energy, guess who would be chairman? mary landrieu. a complete nightmare for the democrats because she is not, obviously -- i mean, coming from an oil-producing state, she's really not in line with most of the party on those issues. and i had a conversation with a democratic aide not that long ago where i basically said so you guys are going to do everything you can to make sure that doesn't happen, right? even if patty murray decides not to take budget, you're going to make ron wyden stay there, right? and the answer was, we don't think we're going to get to that point which said to me, yeah, they're going to do everything they can to prevent landrieu from taking that gavel. >> is the republican leadership blanching at the thought of any of the new ranking republican members doing damage to the agenda? i'm th
in florida and new york, and the board received complaints from pharmacist in texas and iowa how necc was soliciting filling prescriptions. the board also received reports of cease-and-desist orders for necc from colorado. dr. smith, red flags came from across the country and i could go that list of states again. wasn't it obvious that necc was operating on such a large scale that it presented a nationwide, of the sort that wanted greater involvement by the federal government? >> yes. >> did abort a massachusetts request any assistance from the fda? >> i'm not aware of any specific request. however, there were certainly during this most recent outbreak we have worked together. >> but they been doing this for 10 years and y'all have records of the. did you sure those records with the fda, the complaints? >> i'm not aware. i cannot recall and i would have to look back. >> i think that's our problem, and i've been on the committee since 97. we never included federal regulation or compounding pharmacy because, frankly, that's licensing and that's a state. but when they're in a manufacturi
. the president won the cuban vote. the first time infer florida. you saw young voters actually exceeding in most states their turnout from four years ago to the surprise of most analyst. you saw african turn out even though the excitement was four years ago, you saw a real determination there to support the president and you saw african-american rise in a lot of places. that is getting a lot of attention as it should. you have to understand electorate to understand presidential politics. but the president carried most of the key swush suburban counties t. states that are the four heaviest in white population the president won all four of them. so it may be convenient to say we drove good turnout in the latino and african-american community but it's more complex because the president won swing suburban voters and women voters all over the country. presidential campaigns are complicated t. pursuit of 270 electoral votes is complicated. how we won 332 is complicated. it's not just one thing and we'll talk a lot about what that means for politics going forward. one thing i've learn sd you better not
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9